POEM: Near Life Experience

A few years back he had a near
It might as well have been
A disaster movie
Stream of meets tsunami of

This little poem addresses a sort of reverse polarity of near experiences.  People that are alive and have a near are typically glad to return to and are often powerfully reinvigorated by the .  On the other hand, people who are just cruising on autopilot, barely alive, may find a true overwhelming or threatening.  Seeded by a minimum of real life experiences, some people may find the best coping mechanism to extinct such pesky life experiences, never really allowing them to take root or lead them to places anew.  Of course, most of us live somewhere in the middle of the spectrum of full .  Paying attention takes energy and focus.  Most of us are enough to travel in well-worn grooves that demand less .  Certainly, even habitual behaviors can be experienced mindfully, but the energy and focus needed to see seemingly familiar situations with a high degree of freshness and openness can be daunting.  If you had a thousand people go through the motions of a “regular” day of yours, they would each it differently.  This is because any situation can be viewed from a vast array of perspectives.  So, what would be the different of your experiences from the point of view of the other people with whom you interact?  What of people from a different country or ?  a different planet?!  Our built-in egocentricity makes looking at everything only from our own a default mode.  Of course, the care-taking of our own interests reinforces this tendency.  It is no surprise that I am more interested in my own desires and interests than others.  Nonetheless, a key characteristic of life is and growth.  To grow, to evolve, we must develop competencies to view our life and the life of others from an ever-growing array of perspectives. To be a competent human being we must be able to see life from a variety of perspectives.  May you experience the vast richness of perspectives, seeing the depth of your own experiences and the depth of others’ experiences.

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